Everything about taichi

Tachi Parts and terminology
In the world of Tachi, it is important to know the vocabulary of this world, because only Japanese words are used! But don't worry, this page will help you find your way around and learn some Japanese words at the same time! 
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Samekawa:Sticker for the handle of a Japanese sword and katana
ray skin alias“Samegawa” is the stingray leather  on the handle of the katana, and in the early days of China, large quantities of stingray skins  were imported from the South Seas, and were called "鲛 skin" (in ancient Chinese, "鲛" means shark) or pearl fish skin.
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mekugi:Props used to fix the handle and nakago of katana
Mekugi is a prop similar to a pin that firmly secures the handle of the knife to the nakago, preventing it from falling out during the action. The holes in the handle and nakago are called "OYATSUBU". When the sword needs to be removed, simply pull out the mekugi and shake the nakago out of the handle.  
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boshi meaning
The hamon of the kassaki is called "boshi", different hamons have different boshi, and because there are so many different types of boshi, it has been compared to the face of a human being. Hardening the kissaki area requires considerable skill, so the shape of the boshi can be used to gauge the skill of the swordsmith and thus the value of the sword itself.
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“Sori”-the radian of the blade
Sori refers to the radian characteristics of the blade, and the blade with different radians can be customized to the forging cutter according to user preferences. Different factions of forging cutters also have their own characteristics in making blade radians, and with the passage of time, there is a trend of moving from the back of the blade to the front.
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Yasurime
In addition to the shape of the nakakago, swordsmiths also put a certain pattern of stripes on the nakakago, called yasurime, which is called suridashi on the underside of the nakakago where the yasurime begins. yasurime increases the friction between the nakakago and the grip, making it less likely that the grip will fall off. 
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tachi vs katana
The two were used in different times and situations, with tachi being used mainly from the late Heian Period (12th century) to the early Muromachi Period, and katana being used later than tachi, from about the middle of the Muromachi Period to the end of the Edo Period. Therefore, it can be said that katana is the successor of tachi. 
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odachi sword
The larger the weapon, the more powerful it becomes, which is the highest pursuit of weapons by many barbarians. The principle of focusing on energy far more than skill makes him a victorious general on the battlefield. However, in Futarasan jinja, Japan, people here worship a giant odachi with a total length of over three meters. This size of weapon is far beyond the scope of normal human use, but what is even more surprising is that this size of sword is not a case in Japan. Who are these swords made for, and what kind of arm are those who play with them.
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tachi
The tachi is one of the categories of Japanese swords, a type from the early stages of Japanese sword development, generally longer and used for cavalry combat or command. The blade is more curved and the hilt is mostly upturned.
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Tenka Goken-Japanese swords
In ancient Japan, swords played a very important role, not only as weapons, but also as symbols of culture. Among them, the five ancient Japanese swords known as "Tenka Goken", mikadukimunechika, doujigiri, onimaru kunitsuna, otenta odenta, and jyuzumaru, are widely praised for their unique history and legendary stories. 
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